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the positions, the issues, even the constitutional interpretation that is shared by the vast majority of civil rights organizations. and by the vast majority of african-americans. we know that simply putting women in a space, for example, had congresswoman bachmann ended up as the president of the united states she may not have been representative of women issues because so many women on on the side of the reproductive rights and justice. on other hand, it it's good to have people with diverse opinions. and my biggest concern i worry that the president has lessened his diversity in part because he suspects it will cause less of a battle with the senate nominating -- the senate process but i bet it won't. in other words, these republicans are so determined to stand in the way, it won't matter if it's white men or black women, as long as they're coming from the president, they're going to get resistance. >> melissa harris-perry, thank you so much. i want to remind everybody you can catch melissa has she hosts her show at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. does president obama need a binder full of women o
in '94. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> so amy, when you hear this comment and several others including the internet comment of david king, it seems the nra strategy is we're under siege. yesterday's executive action mentioned by joe biden, we know, set off a firestorm with some conservatives. how's there a reasonable conversation when an organization sees themselves as a victim, amy? >> i think the white house is that they have great respect for the 2nd amendment. >> every time the white house says that, you then have what i pointed to, others who say, yes, you are. how do you meet them in the middle? >> it's going to be hard. that's for sure. i mean, but i think they're going to have to meet in the middle. the person to do that is vice president biden. coming off the fiscal cliff debate. a lot of friends on the hill and the senate. maybe they can strike a balance. >> let me play bill clinton. a speech yesterday at the consumer electronics show in l
who she is and why you think she's such a good pick. >> she was formerly the wife of the slain civil rights leader medger everies in jackson mississippi, in front of his wife and children, by a back-shooting coward by the name of byron beckwith. she pursued the case for 30 years and got a brave attorney to take her case. it was made into movie called " "ghosts of mississippi." she has been a stalwart, stubborn, wonderful lady who dedicated herself to getting justice for her husband and finally got it. and remarkably this is the first time a non-clergymen or non-clergy person has been allowed to give the invocation at a presidential inaugural. i think it's terrific. i think it to put her in the spotlight is a great thing. >> jennifer: well, i think it is a great symbol as well, and i appreciate, as always, your insights, and you are one of our favorite columnists, so thank you, charlie for sharing with us. charlie pierce of "esquire" magazine. health insurance companies were given an inch. now they're taking a whole yard. they just cannot seem to help themselves. we'll hear about that
various views with legal and justice organizations. civil rights organizations, participation in national service organizations from one club to the rotary club. youth groups, campus groups, peace groups. gun safety advocates from the brady group to the major gun safety organizations. the educators that are groping for answers, the mental health community including the american academy that we have been through, it is not an extensive study. but the literature that the staff has been working. much of what we already had, trying to devour. the most interesting meeting is with an interfaith group. not only the traditional mainstream protestant churches, the catholic council of bishops, but evangelicals. they are reluctant to engage in is because it is may be an attack on a cultural thing related to gun ownership and the like. all these groups with the muslim community, the hindu community, etc.. it was really a fascinating discussion. and then we matt with sportsmen groups that is distinct from but do not disagree with the gun owner groups. they have a different perspective that includes th
a civil rights group says jihad is an arabic word which means an uphill struggle to get to a better place. it can be a struggle to be patient, to make friends or to stay in shape. >> unfortunately the word jihad has been hijacked by muslim and anti muslim to put forward war struggle. >> reporter: we showed the ads to people who had not noticed them. >> i don't particularly like them. no. >> reporter: why not? >> i just think it's not making me feel comfortable. >> if they put that up it's probably going to create more confusion but at least it'll get the conversation going and the conversation is good. >> i think anything that's going to help raise people's awareness, maybe help diminish stereo types people have will be a good thing. >> reporter: the tads will be on buses until the end of the month. the campaign will also take place in other major cities. saying it is time for islams to take back a word that is part of creed. >>> victims of a home invasion robbery in san francisco say the robbers were looking for one thing, marijuana. now police are looking for the men who broke into an a
guys. >> it means killing people. >> reporter: but care of the council of islamic relations a civil rights group says jihad is an arabic word which means an uphill struggle to get to a better place. it can be a struggle to be patient, to make friends or to stay in shape. >> unfortunately the word jihad has been hijacked by muslim and anti muslim to put forward war struggle. >> reporter: we showed the ads to people who had not noticed them. >> i don't particularly like them. no. >> reporter: why not? >> i just think it's not making me feel comfortable. >> if they put that up it's probably going to create more confusion but at least it'll get the conversation going and the conversation is good. >> i think anything that's going to help raise people's awareness, maybe help diminish stereo types people have will be a good thing. >> reporter: the tads will be on buses until the end of the month. the campaign will also take place in other major cities. saying it is time for islams to take back a word that is part of creed. >>> victims of a home invasion robbery in san francisco say the rob
floor for days reading phone books to fight a civil rights being voted on. why don't they force these guys go on c-span and read the phone book. >> there is a fourth and a fifth. they let this game get out of hand in the first term. don't upset them because maybe we can deal with them. don't upset the right wing crazy--it hasn't worked. the press has dropped the ball. they will not explain what the entire filibuster culture is, and there is no price to pay for being radically obstructionist. >> john: that's why i read your column. thank you for being here this evening. >>> it's time to be here when were you players enter the baseball hall of fame which makes it a proud day for--nobody. that's it. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> john: for the first time since 1996, the baseball writers of america did not elect anyone to be inducted into the baseball hall of fame. this despite the fact that to of the best players of the last 30 years were on the ballot. roger clemens and barry bonds. a seven-time mvp, the only player in major league history to hit over 500 home runs, bonds is the all-t
significance for the inauguration because it takes place on the federal holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworp in four years ago and he'll use his wife's family bible for a private swearing in at the white house the day before the public ceremony. >>> a developing story out of cap da. right now marine biologists are trying to save whales trapped in ice. the 11 killer whales are sharing a single hole and the hole is shrinking as temperatures drop. one scientists think the whales got stuck during a sudden freeze. canada's government says it is aware of the situation and is trying to figure out what can be done. >>> their temperatures are dropping and ours on the rise? >> parts of siberia are 60 below zero right now and up in northern alaska, it's 25 below zero for the last couple of weeks. here? where's winter? nowhere near. gorgeous sunrise this morning in case you missed it this is the view from our hd city camera. this was right before sunrise at 7:20 a.m. on this thursday morning. you can post your pictures to weather @nbcwashing
white dead, but he is not pleading guilty to the federal charges that he violated white's civil rights by not trying to get him medical care or that he obstructed justice by filing a false report about the incident. mr. mcintosh represented he was not the first person to find him unresponsive. when in fact he did find him unresponsive >> reporter: he's facing up to 20 years. reporting live s. i'm tracee wilkins, news4. >>> a woman was groped while jogging in annandale, virginia. the latest happened last night about 5:45. the woman was 30 years old and was approached near brierwood court and patriot drive. she screamed and then he ran away. 14 other groping inns don't have happened in fairfax county since early in september. >>> a retired firefights is being held as a hero after hess pulled a woman from a burning home. that fire started about 10:00 this morning on pond meadow lane. the former prince george's county firefighters ran to the house after he saw smoke coming out of there. he saw a dog frantically barking. the dog led him to the sliding glass door in the back. he looked insid
of federal government lawsuits accusing him of racial profiling and numerous other civil rights violations we don't have the time to list. but now sheriff joe tells us that he's the man to protect the children of phoenix. and this is yet another reason for why the vice president's task force must take a comprehensive and considered approach to the issue of
for his false statement. >> mcintosh pled not guilty to a second obstruction of justice charge and a civil rights violation. he is free on his own recognizance but is due back in court in april facing possibly 2.5 years in prison. live in greenbelt, richard reeve, abc 7 news. >> time for a look at the other top stories. a man accused of killing his estranged wife and stepson in montgomery county has entered an alford plea. the police say curtis lopez killed jane mcquain inside of her germantown apartment in october and beat her son william to death with baseball bat. lopez was arrested in north carolina one day after mcquain's body was found. he is facing a possible sentence of life without possibility of parole. >> a prince george's county by employee has been arrested and charged with extortion and harassment. but investigators say that john brown used his position as a building inspector to threaten a restaurant owner with the fear of losing permits unless the owner paid $1,000 per week for brown's band to perform at the restaurant. >> redskins media sweeping the area, just a couple day
administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 9 miles can make. -- 90 miles can make. virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best day in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas of believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens that our schools are on the way to being the most
to come back here to ohio and make sure that there are no civil rights violations. >> all right, let me ask you. you say voter reform, you're proposing legislation. quickly tell me in a sentence or two what's going to be in the crux of the legislation you're proposing, representative rees. >> early voting needs to be permanent. it was a solution to the problems in 2000. it needs to be perm nant. that needs to be a permanent law. number 2, when it goes to a polling location and goes to the wrong table, their votes should not be thrown away. we want to make provisional ballots be something that is counted. reverend sharpton, i want to thank you. you're going to be starting a national network chapter. we're going to be working without you throughout the state of ohio. >> yeah, i'll be there tomorrow evening to kick that chapter off and make sure we protect voters' rights. thank you for your time tonight. and have a great weekend. as we -- >> thank you, i'll see you tomorrow. >> see you tomorrow. >>> as we embark on a new year, we must have a renewed fight for many of the things we fought f
legal guys. avery freedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor and he joins us from las vegas. let me remind everyone here about the facts in this particular case. it's been a little while. james holmes charged with 166 counts of murder, attempted murder, and other offenses in that shooting rampage in a movie theater in -- near denver in july. 12 people were kill and dozens were injured in that attack. the preliminary hearing on monday is the first time the prosecutors will outline their case against him in detail. and the "denver post" is reporting that prosecutors have created a chart just to try to keep track of all the different victims and their injuries. hundreds of people are expected to attend this hearing. so let's get started. this hearing starts monday. but it could actually just last all week. it's a hearing, after all, not the trial. we're talking about a lot of new evidence and testimony. so, richard, let me start with you. what is the new stuff we expect to hear or see? >> marty
devoted to civil rights, she'll deliver the invocation at the inauguration of our country's first african-american president. you kept your word. your husband did not shed his blood in vain. had it not been for him him and others, we would not be celebrating what we will celebrate at inauguration day. i'm glad that medgar and others will see that you kept the faith and the nation has grown. this is what america is about. making those that shed their blood not having shed it in vain. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> the folks that brought you the iraq war. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. the folks who quack for iraq have a knack for bad ideas. they pushed us into war ten years ago, they made their case with lies and half truths and flimflam. we had to get revenge for 9/11, so let's attack iraq even though it was al qaeda that hit the twin towers and the pentagon. we have to attack iraq because we've got evidence they have weapons of mass destruction, wmd, even if there's no
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
history or extreme violent tendencies. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. a new report offers a possible answer to what killed junior seau. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hung
question my commitment to their civil rights. whatever chuck hagel's views were as a senator, if he does become secretary of defense, he will have to fall in line with president obama's policies on everything from defense spending to what to do about iran's nuclear program. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. >>> quiet in steubenville, ohio, today after days of media coverage centering on the alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl. both sides are preparing their case for a february 13th trial inform a case that has divided the small ohio town. the two 16-year-old high school football players are charged with sexual assaulting the girl last summer. the alleged attack took place at several parties over the course of a night and were well-documented by students who were there. the defense attorney for one accused teen spoke to our own susan candiotti and he claims a text message may be a crucial piece of evidence in the upcoming trial. attorney adam neeman would not show us the alleged text. the girl's attorney declined to comment on whether it was sent or not. >>> i spoke earlier with walter mad
the government being able to choose who can have a gun. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. ? ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] i
it's an extreme case of criminal history or extreme violent tendencies. >> you try to protect civil rights, and in this country, this comes with some level of horrific events. >>> still to come, a bombshell revelation could affect the game of football forever. a new report offers a possible answer to what killed junior seau. >>> and oscar nominations announced today. did hollywood directors leave the director of "zero dark thirty" out in the cold. (dog) larry,larry,larrryyy. why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest.
to teach and practice civil rights law. and lead a voter registration drive rather than cashing in on his degree. i think those were fundamental choices for him. >> rose: and he was looking for a way to engage in public service rather than take an easy corporate route in high demand with high salary. >> i think he felt that the most rewarding life was one in which you could make a greater difference than just in your own realm, your own level of comfort. >> rose: i want to come back to him and lots of questions about him. but go back to where you are. so you are going to leave politics and just study. >> i'm going to leave campaigns. actually, it's sort of a causei academic position. because what i've done with the university of chicago is create an institute of politics much like the one at harvard and some other-- . >> rose: you mean like the kennedy school. >> well, the kennedy school is one thing. but the iop was something the kennedy school started at harvard to expose young people to practitioners in politics, to encourage them to go into the public arena as candidates, as strategis
accusing him of racial profiling and numerous other civil rights violations we don't have the time to list. but now sheriff joe tells us that he's the man to protect the children of phoenix. and this is yet another reason for why the vice president's task force must take a comprehensive and considered approach to the issue of gun violence. because when god men do nothing idiots tend to thrive. thanks so much for watching. chris matthews and "hardball" is next. >>> out of the way. obama's coming. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i think we're looking at a new barack obama. you know the expression let reagan be reagan. i think we're seeing barack obama be barack obama. an in your face challenge to the right wing. he's putting in a guy who knows the lessons of vietnam and iraq and putting him out front, making him his point man as he goes into the war of hawkish republicans who count the months between wars as an unwanted time-out. who like nothing more than the next war to fight. meet barack obama two. he's going t
the effort was an attack on law-abiding americans. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s, how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> president clinton campaigned tirelessly for the crime bill and often surrounded by police officers who argued they were being outgunned by criminals. the white house added funds to build prisons and put more cops on the streets and ordered to draw more republican votes. even so it was political tightrope. and democrats knew it. though the ban barely survived contentious vote in the house. ultimately passing by just a two-vote martin. 216-the 214. one of the narrowist legislative victories in history. once attached to the larger crime bill the whole thing went back to congress in the fall of '1994. in his book "my life," former president clinton remembered a direct appeal from democrats. just before the house vote on the crime bill, speaker tom foley and majority leader dick gephardt made a last-ditch appeal to remove the assault weapons ban from the bill. they said
and high capacity magazines has become a violation of basic civil rights on par with the racist era of jim crow, and anyone who suggests that it is indeed time to ask whether 30-round clips makes society safer is deemed a traitor to his party. >> mark the date. it isn't going to be long before moderate republicans start going on television to push the notion that guns are hurting republicans with independent voters and women. the moderate, spineless, linguine-spined republicans it isn't going to be long as this controversy heats up. you know, they wilt. >> this outcry is no longer about a difference of opinions regarding what we need to do to keep the nation's children safe. it has become, instead, a rally to amass and protect an arsenal of battlefield grade weapons, ones that may be needed to fend off a government intent on instituting an oppressive dictatorship. >> 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms. >> as ousted tea party congressman from illinois joe walsh said yesterday, we may have to shed blood every couple hundred years to preserve our freedoms. bloodshed, acc
there for reasons related to civil rights and seniority went into the republican party. and race began to fall away as the organizing principle in life. so the parties became more ideological separate from one another. democrats agreeing with democrats, republicans agreeing with republicans. as that happened, they began to act as units. we don't have a political system set up very well for parties to act as units. the founders didn't want there to be parties at all. they were very against factions even though they went on to create a number of them. the 112th was a culmination of a lot of trends we've been seeing over the last 40 or 50 years. and the composition of the congress in which you had a republican speaker from the republican minority in the house. you had a very slim democratic majority in the senate that was subject to the filibuster and a democratic president the republicans were trying to defeat was a perfect cocktail for this paralysis and polarization but i'm not optimistic about the 113th because even if they do try to do things through regular order, these same underlying dynamics
? these are civil rights. >> this is a huge mistake -- >> listen. let jennifer get in there. >> i think it's a huge mistake for lars to invent these improbables. we're talking about gun sales not gun gifts. >> yes, we are. >> no, we're not. the vice president is talking about gun sales. secondly, you just made the argument why we can't comply with those. why shouldn't we? you and larry go down to the gun shop and get it done. >> that's easy. it hasn't caused a problem. >> then we should be doing it right now. wait a second, lars, i'm not done. there is room for creative law making here. and here's what i would suggest, the president wants 100,000 teachers in america, i don't see any statistics down 100,000 teachers, how about 100,000 police officers, we'll have them armed and in the school and the fairfax -- >> i can tell you reasons that won't work. >> i like that. >> we should arm the teachers. >> no. we should have police officers. >> why not? >> because they are trained -- >> you don't trust the teachers? >> i've got to get out. >> i don't, actually. i trust the police officer better than i do
, as well as the college students were. and it was the height of the civil rights movement. the vietnam war. so many issues to become engaged in. so i started moving up the ladder at the college station, interned at a local all-news radio station, and that was the end of the violin. >> then you just kept working at it and loved it? >> it wasn't quite that simple. it was in a day when they did not hire women for newsroom jobs in broadcasting. period. there were a few anchor women, a few weather women, there were just not average run of the mill journalist assignment reporters, and i was told they weren't about to do it at this radio station, and i could go into advertising or promotion. i was accepted in the corporate trainee program, actually, and i said, hire me as a copy boy, which is what they -- they require copy. it's predigital -- back in the days of film and television and a very different era. so they give me the midnight to 8:00 shift, and said if i prove myself, there where no one would see me, i might -- and i worked my way up. i don't know if that's your experience as well. i i'
of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [applause] [chanting] secondly, this vision, you could call it ini
people are. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. and maybe that trinity based organizations are narrow minded and to anxious to get the income grants and to build five units of housing. that is not going to change the system. that is where people are. for the last four years i've been working with the building trades. i have been working with them to the young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so they can become the workers. as conservative as they are, that operate 1200 job training centers in the construction grade. it is the second-largest job training mechanism outside the u.s.. guess what? there in a coalition filled with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts working together for the last four years to say "how do we change, how do we improve?" the national leadership has gone across 350 cities in u.s.. try to convince them that they need to change. this is encouraging. i think we have to do that kind of work. i think people like me would be justified in writing this people off. in order to change america and need th
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
is to protect the civil rights of homeless people. >> statewide recommendations at a uniform plan in every california city where homeless people can get health care and find a clean bathroom or a place to stay. >> we are not going to usurp any local community's local laws about it but like to provide direction for how to alleviate homelessness. >> the goal is to help the homelessness rather than criminalize them. would also include free legal representation. >>> new this morning, a shooting in san bruno puts a teenaged girl in the hospital. it happened just before 10:30 last night near the intersection of santa teresa way and park boulevard next to cappuccino high school. the san mateo county sheriff's office says the girl who was shot was 16 years old from south san francisco. right now in stable condition. no arrests have been made. >>> across the nation, several gun shows within an hour's drive from where gunman opened fire at an elementary school in connecticut have been cancelled. organizers say the shows were just not appropriate in the weeks after the gunman killed 26 people includi
rights activists in the u.s. congress declared her the first lady of civil rights. ted nugent likes to wear confederate flag t-shirts and uses the "n" word in interviews. rosa parks tried to clear the stench of discrimination from our country. ted nugent admitted to soiling himself during his vietnam board physical and not clearing the stench so he could avoided serving his country. rosa parks said each person must live their life as a model for others. ted nugent wrote a song called wang dang sweet poon tang. rosa parks received the congressional medal and ted nugent once told the detroit free press apartheid isn't that cut and dry all men aren't created equal. rosa parks started a scholarship donation and donated most of her money to helping kids go to college.
on the federal holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworn in four years ago. he'll use his wife's family bible for a private swearing-in at the white house the day before the public ceremony. >>> you can see relics from the first presidential inauguration now at mt. vernon. george washington's estate is displaying items from that historic event in honor of president obama's inauguration. you'll be able to see the suit washington wore. you can also see part of the first draft of washington's inaugural address. the suit will be on display until the end of april. the inaugural address will be on display through march. >>> imagine sharing part of your home with someone for a year and not even knowing about it. in washington state, a retired woman said she couldn't figure out why she could smell what she thought was marijuana, as well as why parts of her house were suddenly cold. she called a furnace repair man. he crawled into the crawl space below her home and that's when they figured out what was going on. >> the good news is i got the vents f
holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworn in four years ago. he'll use his wife's family bible for a private softwarin a day before the public ceremony. >>> today new mortgage rules being announced to -- to late to help those caught up in the mortgage crisis. w we have more. >>> good morning. the consumer finance watchdog is rolling out new rules aimed at curbing risky mortgages. the rules which take effect next year will impose a range of requirements and restrictions on banks and lenders. they'll have to verify and inspect borrowers' financial records and will be prohibited from saddling people with payments totaling 43% of their annual income. now "interest only and no doc loans" which helped inflate the housing bubble will be banned. there will be limits placed on loans that offer teaser rates that balloon after a few years. >>> plastic is proving to be popular at starbucks. a new survey by ugov.com finds more than a quarter of consumers say they've bought or plan to buy one of the coffee chain's reusable plastic coffee cups to c
-- no it is a right for god's sake. >> stephanie: right. i think that's what has made this civil right's movement go so much faster. is because of that. >> caller: right. >> stephanie: and i'm also -- was a practicing catholic. i got so good i went professional, so i don't practice anymore. but i never thought about it. >> caller: yeah, see my attitude was always that god doesn't have any discretion of who he loves. so that wasn't it but it was like, oh you know, no. and now i'm like my god what happened? when the president did it made it a universal thing. >> stephanie: i think chuck hagel is generally a good guy, and i think at that time all around the world there was still a lot of homophobia. the way it sounds now, we go that's really homophobic. >> caller: yep. i love you guys. and i get up early in the morning so i'm watching you guys early. >> stephanie: yay! she's precious. [ applause ] >> stephanie: here is a story that will make you feel better whether you are gay or straight -- [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: oregon man arrested for choking his girlfr
think about the civil rights movement, a black power movement, feminism, the various feminism of that area. and eventually make a and lesbian rights movement and other movements that challenge the idea that there really is one male breadwinner model of the american family. when liberalism experienced those challenges it went into a prolonged period of political crisis. it said that political historical moment that the conservative movement steps into the breach with liberalism in crisis and proposes a kind of new model of the american family, one that does not require economic support for economic assistance, but one that requires moral protection. and so the book really tells the story of the politicized american family going from the family that needs support economically to one that needs protection morally. that's how i characterized the shift from a liberal political culture to a more conservative political culture. the critical difference between the liberal, the previous, the pre-1960s liberal model of the family and the post-1970s conservative model and the family real
. >> stephanie: yeah, the referendum in new jersey he said we should not be putting civil rights to a popular vote. so boy, i hope this all gets resolved at the supreme court. >> if we had you still wouldn't have been able to eat at the same table as black people. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: the headline chris christie is able to fill the void. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: looks like he is positioning himself for 2016 presidential run. although he said it would be crazy for anyone to try to plan four years from now. [ cuckoo clock chimes ] >> stephanie: a new poll shows christie crushing -- [ laughter ]. >> that's awful. we need acceptance. >> stephanie: yes, stop putting in immature sound effects. >> so you are saying chris christie wants to run. >> that's all we can do. >> stephanie: he was born to run. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: seventeen minutes after the hour back with more fridays with fugelsang on the "stephanie miller show." >> very interesting but stupid. >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ [ ryon ] eating shrimp at red lobster
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
of that and of the civil rights movement i was just a junkie by the time i was 9-years-old i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and when i was 10i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay running for the mayor of new york but i wouldn't work for him at the headquarters, i want to the liberal party come on new york you could run on to. i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york, and some woman felt this was cute this ely handing out leaflets, and she asked me why they make the case for lindsey and got an early start of my political career and made the case against the opponent as well. we to get back to the liberal party headquarters and open it up and there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills and so in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [applause] >> you also sold a bumper stickers. >> those of us that have lived through it remember that is a time of great idealism and the campaign was infused with idealism as tragically as it ended, and wh
pleased to announce that our administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. function.\and dys but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 90 miles can make. [applause] virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best state in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas where i believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens
members in the previous comment. an update on nelson mandela's health. the 94-year-old civil rights icon doing a little bit better. straight ahead -- >> what's going to dominate washington for the next threements here is going to be spending and debt. >> senator mitch mcconnell doesn't think gun control gets any movement in congress any time soon, but the white house may have something up its sleeve. we've learned a little bit more about what it's planning. we'll tell you about it and some rare unpublished color photos of the beatles first u.s. tour have been recovered. they are up for sale as well. you can probably get a really good deal on them. we'll give you a preview. this is msnbc, the place for politics and beatles stuff as well on sunday afternoons. . >>> here's a quick look at stories making news right now. doctors say former south african president nelson mandela is recovering well after being hospitalized for a lung infection and surgery to remove galstones and hockey fans, good news for you. the nhl announcing a tentative agreement for a new collective bargaining agreement wi
in on this stuff partly because of the history of what the civil rights movement faced and -- >> look, we're not a national security group. we're a freedom group and this is about freedom at the end of the day. this country, we used to be completely opposed to the government spying on your mail, but now it's online and we're apparently cool with, you can read all my e-mail and listen to all ni cell phone conversations. that's a big problem. >> although that's one thing congress did right but i'll get back to that. >> you know, the -- as far as we know, right? >> right. >> i live a few miles from the national security agency, who knows with them? but with the usa patriot act, its definition of terrorism says, if you break a law while p putting lives in danger, seeking to influence policy in the united states, you've violated the patriot act. that's like everything martin luther king did in public. >> breaking laws? law plauzbly, who knows. >> birmingham, the children's march, the march on washington, the march -- every anti-abortion protest? any time you're in the street you put people in
funded runaway slaves. she actually--some of the early landmark civil rights cases in california she funded. and then--and near the end of her life, things became even more bizarre. she was sort of connected to a very wealthy senator from--state senator from california and was taken to court and so it just becomes, you know, this saga. but as a figure, i mean, she's just inspirational and just formidable. c-span: $30, 643 pages for your book. where did you write it? >> guest: wrote it all over the world. i actually--you know, i was in north carolina after i did the initial traveling, i did some there. i went to new york where i had been living for 13 years. c-span: what were you doing in new york? >> guest: well, i taught at columbia and sarah lawrence college. i was for a year at the university--i'm sorry--at the american academy in rome, the rome prize. so that was where the bulk of it was actually completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to liv
forfeit its rights. however, we cannot give amnesty on behalf of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [ap
top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from top down change. when that top down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it m
the finger to a cop can sue. the arrest was not lawful. the man's attorney calls it an important civil rights victory. unus >> announcer: this national weather report sponsored by subway restaurants. subway. build your better breakfast. >>> it is a story that has torn an ohio town apart. it involves high school football stars, allegations of rain and digital vigilante act. many believe it was not a crime. >>> and environmental groups accuse shell of going too far looking for offshore oil in alaska. john miller has the story of a shell drilling ship suspected of being criminally unsafe on "cbs this morning." >> announcer: this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by the u.s. postal service. schedule your free package pickup today. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ try our entrees, snacks and new salads. salmon with basil, garlic chicken spring rolls, and now salads, like asian-style
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forward as well. >> this has been through the ages, active in the women's suffrage movement and civil rights movement. >> yes. >> from the beginning. >> yes, we are founded on january 13, 1913 at howard, and the first act of the founders was to participate in the suffrage march, in march of 1913. >> we're showing here prominent deltas through the years, as we mark this centennial event. >> so many who have been a part of our organization. they've gone on of course, of course, to do great things in their life. they started out with us. barbara jordan ran for financial secretary of the sorority before she became famous. >> right. moving forward here, what do you see as the main mission? you have this wonderful grassroots movement. >> right. >> with women who are dedicated to making our communities better, the community at large better. what do you see moving forward now? >> as we celebrate, because we're having a myriad of events this year. >> yeah. >> started with the float in the rose bowl parade, where we're not only celebrating history, but making history at the same time, by being
that is not republican or democrat. but they're inclined to vote for gun control and side with what is the civil and right thing to do. >> yeah, i think melissa makes an important point. 38 republicans back in '94, when the assault weapons ban was originally passed, it's since expired, 38 different republicans voted for it. i think a lot of those republicans from the northeast, particularly from new york and pennsylvania, a lot of these republicans know there's a problem for them and a problem for their party. if the entire tone of the party is set by the most right wing members, many of them from the south. and so we'll never get anything done on this unless there is significant support from republicans. and there does seem to be developing support from them particularly on the big ban on the magazines and universal background checks. >> so that would be a big development. if they are talking about supporting and really going against the grain of these more right wingers, that means that we may have enough votes to really get something significantly done? >> i absolutely think that's what's goi
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
to ambassador hormel and any lgbt americans who may question my commitment to their civil rights. >> barbara starr is joining us right now. on that last point that you just made, i assume he is totally committed to making sure equal rights for gays and lesbians serving in the united states military will be fully honored, no going back to don't ask, don't tell or anything along those lines? >> well, that's absolutely right, wolf. when you are the secretary of defense in this country, you carry out the president's policies. this is mandatory. there's no choice on these matters. so by accepting the nomination and being willing to serve as secretary of defense, he will have to do this. in fact, many members of the gay and lesbian community are looking for additional rights to be granted to them when they are partners of either those serving in the military or in the military themselves. i think for most americans one of the -- besides all of the questions we've discussed here, what would lead to troops being taken into another conflict, into another war after so many years in iraq and afghanista
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
>> good morning, everyone. i am barbara arnwine, direct her for civil rights under law, which runs the election protection coalition. the election protection coalition was founded roughly right after the election debacle in 2000 florida and we've been operating election protection is a program ever since and really our first up ration was in 2001. we are composed of 150 nationalized state wide, local grassroots organizations that are supplemented by the resources of 200 law firms. this last election, we have paraded 28: centers. we had omicron operations in a rickety jurisdictions. we had 5300 vehicle volunteers and roughly 2300 grassroots volunteers. as you can imagine, i'm very grateful for the opportunity to comment on the recent 2012 election. the lawyers committee will be issuing for election protection in nature report this month. so in two weeks you should be able to ask our analysis based on the roughly 190,000 calls we received, the grassroots reports from these jurisdictions and everything else. our basic code inclusion may be different from what you heard in the first p
for civil rights under law which runs the election protection coalition. the election protection cohiggs was founded roughly right after the election debacle in 2000 in florida, and we've been operating election protection as a program ever since and really our first operation was in 2001. we are composed of 150 nationwide, statewide, local, grassroots organizations that are supplemented by the resources of 200 law firms. we, this last election we operated 28 call-in centers, we had on of the-ground operations in over 80 jurisdictions, we had 5,300 legal volunteers and roughly 2,300 grass roots vols tiers -- volunteers. this, as you can imagine, i'm very grateful for this opportunity to comment on the recent 2012 elections. the lawyers' committee will actually be issuing more election protection, a major report this month. so in two weeks you should be able to access our analysis based on the roughly, you know, 190,000 calls we received, the grassroots reports from these 80 jurisdictions and everything else. our basic conclusion may be different than what you heard in the first panel bec
with on a number of issues, still many feel that gay rights like marriage equality is a civil rights issue. the "talk back" question for you today, should we welcome pastors in the public square despite their views on homosexuality. facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me at @carolcnn. i'll be right back. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us, i'm carol costello. time to check the top stories. >>> the federal government wants to give boeing's newest airline another look. the department of transportation will conduct a comprehensive review of the boeing 787 dreamlin dreamliner's critical systems including design, manufacturing, and assembly. the federal government says the aircraft are safe to fly. the 787 has had a pretty difficult week, though, incidents include a fire that started in the battery compartment of a japanese airliner and a fuel leak in another japan airlines jet. >>> afghan president hamid karzai arriving at the white house minutes ago for a one-on-one meeting with president obama. the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan topped the agenda.
vii of the civil rights act makes it unlawful to discriminate based on gender. a distinction saying that women are the problem they should be fired or what the iowa supreme court found was that this particular woman is a problem because right or wrong, justified or not, she poses a threat to the marriage. and that was the basis for him firing her. >> what about that, what is the dentist supposed to do when he feels attraction for her, he's a married man and the wife says she's got to go and the law says you have to keep her in your employ? >> yes, it does and i'm looking at the opinion right now. the court absolutely got this wrong. section 2116 of the iowa code says it's unlawful to discriminate based on sex and may have a devastating impact based on sex. >> it's not. >> the cases that the court cited that you brought up had to do where an employee and an employer had a consensual sexual relationship. that didn't happen here so those cases aren't on point. >> would the position be the same, a male employer found a male employee too hot and fired him. >> megyn: hold that thought and
'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. for a professional cleansing device? join the counter revolution and switch to olay pro-x. get cleansing results as effective as a $200 system. guaranteed or your money back. olay pro-x. >>> good day to all of you. welcome to "weekends with alex witt," it's 1:00 p.m. on the east coast, 10:00 a.m. out west. new today,
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
active as civil rights laws. so it influences private law. so there could be a market for privacy. so they come along and say we will make it easier for you. and then facebook had to modify things and so forth. so what i am suggesting is a type of touchstone. before i buy an iphone, i give consideration to all the security. anywhere you go on the web, when it's not protected -- if you think about things like that the people might hold as private. >> you do a lot of coverage around the intersection of technology. does this seem like a real step forward to you? can you talk about your reaction? >> well, i think it speaks to the problems at this point. a lot of judges interpret the law around these technologies and don't always understand the technology. many have found that there are expressions are under around her e-mail and law enforcement can only get that technological issue straightened out. many would say that it is upsetting. in terms of trying to apply everything -- i mean, the constitution is supposed to have businesses not be able to look at a facebook page when they are maki
name is marceline white come on the executive director of the american civil rights coalition, ncrc. ncrc works for maryland consumers for research, education and advocacy. am also proud homeowner in baltimore city. thank you today. i appreciate all the work the bureau has done on these rules. homeownership as a now is a viable avenue for wealth building, especially for low and moderate income families. we know that these families use home-equity to increase the assets and to borrow against home equity, we know this is particularly true in communities of color. so we know that the work you're doing is incredibly important for all of our families come a special low and moderate income families. it's imperative that the mortgage lending rules adequately balance the needs of financial institutions and consumers. and it's important it opens up and provides more access to credit as well as clear and transparent standards for borrowers and lenders. however, our concern right now is that as written, the rules are too much to protect banks at the expense of working families. our concerns ar
escape from slavery. >> what? >> for the civil right's crowd -- for the -- the hip left gay marriage is -- is up from slavery in the same sense -- >> wow. >> -- of punishment or discrimination or what have you? >> i think he is off his meds. >> stephanie: karl can you translate that? >> this is right after he started comparing the push for marriage equality to some apparent push to normalize pedophilia. >> stephanie: oh right. >> rush tries to stay away from me. and elton john performed at his last -- i guess his fourth wedding, so you don't hear him talk about it too much and he is remarkably uncomfortable when he does talk about it and it doesn't always make a lot of sense. >> stephanie: oh good. speaking of not making sense it's pastor john haggy. >> the bible requirements for getting married are these. one that you marry someone of the opposite sex. and genesis 101 says god created male and female. anything else is too disturbed people playing house. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: oh! two disturbed people playing house. wow. [ laughter ] >> i would like to point
and handed him a protest note expressing serious concern over the matter. >> human rights groups say it's time for the government in nepal to improve the rule of law and live up to the terms of reconciliation as part of the peace deal that ended the civil war. >> these violations cannot escape. we have been suffering from this problem of impunity in nepal, especially those crimes that took place during conflict. >> a u.n. report documented more than 9,000 cases of human rights violations by both government forces and maoist insurgents during the civil war that ended in 2006. a promise truth and reconciliation commission has not yet emerged nor has the law been changed to recognize torture as a crime. human rights watch says colonel kumar lama's arrest in britain sends out a warning to those accused of serious crimes that they cannot escape justice. >> a man's been arrested in northern ireland after shots were apparently fired at police. nine police officers were injured during overnight clashes inble fast and violence follows weeks of protest over a decision not fly the union flag all y
of -- the grimms never go out of style. >> that's right. finally, a civil war card collection. >> in wednesday's kids post, we tell the story of adam webb. he's 11 years old from manassas. the national park service, in honor of this civil war, put out a set of 189 trading cards, like the ones you see here. and adam collected all 189 from boston to south carolina. he collected all of them. he loves the civil war. he's a great story. he's in wednesday's kids post. >> impressive. all right, tracy, thanks as always. for more, visit nbcwashington.com or washingtonpost.com and click on kids post. that's kids post this week on tv. >> that was cool about the eagles. i like that. >> i've seen a few running along the river early last spring. i noticed i never really get that close to one in the wild. they're big. >> they're huge. >> i was just glad he didn't look like he wanted a runner on the menu. it was a big bird. >> a lot of people run outside during the winter. today could be a decent day. >> excellent running weather for winter standards around here. the sun is out. that's the most important thin
administration. i would also point out, wolf, that john mccain is on the same side as the liberal civil rights group the aclu in this. they are raising the same kinds of questions. even though in the past, brennan has said that he opposes these enhanced interrogation techniques. >> we'll watch these confirmation hearings every step of the way. >> should be interesting, both of them. >> low flying helicopters have people in some of the country's biggest cities asking questions. the answers have to do with preparations for a possible terrorist attack. using radioactive dirty bombs. >>> plus, before we get to that, we have some new details emerging about the colorado theater shootings, including the suspect's strange behavior once he was caught. uncer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's
are facing. the israeli military is racing to reinforce its border with syria as its neighbors civil war is intensifying. the united nations human rights center estimates 60,000 people have been killed in the fighting for more on israel's threat from syria, iran, its relations with the obama administration, joined by deputy speaker of the israeli in discernible. happy new year. and that looks as though some progress is being made in gaza. it looks as though this broker cease-fire is holding. are you optimistic about what it pretends? >> of very tough neighborhood. you have to be very -- ready all the time. you have a cease-fire. the cease-fire is for a few months, maybe a year, but technology. we know it is only a matter of time. must act again. next time it will be in a different manner. lou: even as now, permitting materials, downplaying but acknowledging things are improving. even a suggestion on the part of the israeli government that it could be permanent. >> we live in a better life. then think about the over palestinians. getting ready for the next conflict. unfortunately the inte
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
and defenders associations, prosecutors. we met with civil rights organizations. we met with national service organizations. kiwanas, rotary international. we have met with youth groups. we have met with gun safety advocates. yesterday that meeting took place here. also come up a dozen other organizations -- also, a dozen other organizations. and we met with educators and parents from the school boards to the state school offices and associations. again, the governors of thoseand maybe one of the most important things we have been focusing on is the mental health community. the american academy for childhood and adolescence psychiatry, the national counselor community of behavioral health centers. there is a perspective among health providers that mental illness is a major component. and yesterday, we finished up on in this room with about 17 members of the faith community, which in all the years i have been doing this, the first time there has been overwhelming consensus on the evangelical groups nationwide. particularly those from the rural areas. the national catholic conference of bishops
that standard going to be and how are going to test people in a way that complies with the civil rights but, of course, has the overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out pro and con for law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado. about public safety implications and whether moving toward legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i appreciate your point that i would tell you i suppose worked a lot on my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i've heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. one thing we have to do now is come up with a standard that will protect people who come and visit our state and drive on the roads so that people know that there is going to be a safe system for them. and we're not sure yet how to do that to our legislature has this as job one that starts this next week in colorado. i think your point of view, your input would be really valuable in our state. >> you are against legalization and colorado, is that right? >> yesterday i was suppos
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
a civil war to adjudicate slavery's future in the united states. and then it took another hundred years for us to get a voting rights act. so before we are too self-righteous about thomas jefferson, i think we need to watch what everybody -- what many, many americans have been guilty of and kpli sit in. >> talk about how you got to know jefferson. literally in montecello and what made him tick. >> going there is the closest we're ever going to get to having a conversation with jefferson. he always said he woke up as soon as the rays of light began to make out the hands of the clock over his bed. and i wanted to see if that were true. i wanted to hear the clocks. and it was so important to him. so they were kind enough for me to go look at what historians call material culture. so i went, slept on the floor. and right before dawn what was so remarkable -- and i would not have known this if i hadn't done this, is as the sun comes up over the southwestern mountains, the first place a ray of light hits is jefferson's bed. and nothing was by accident in jefferson's life. so he was so energet
of the civilized -- >> that's right. we spend more money on healthcare. >> bill: we obviously are not spending our money wisely. >> very efficiently. i think that's an accurate statement. yes, given the findings of this report. >> wow. >> bill: too much on medical arms race or maybe still call it? and not enough on prevention? >> well, certainly that may be part of it. the emphasis on prevention. we also have to think of how social policy, economic policy, other factors community development policies have implicationses for health. for example we have a society that's highly based on automobile transportation just to give you an example. thats a unintended implicationses for health. physical activity, for injuries. so i think one of the key things the committee found is we really need to look very broadly at a whole range of factors because this is such a systemic problem across multiple different conditions. not just a single or a couple factors. >> i think that's interesting because you think about the health. i think the overall issue is you've got the establishment of our healthcare system and
a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really looked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still in civil commitment issues. and so, it's kind of an ongoing project. it exists in a host of different context. i don't know if you're talking about a different context, but people civilly committed for sex offenses, people committed because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups, actually address and raise the due process concerned around civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind in incarceration, and why -- what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so one of the -- aside from the campaigned in overincarceration at the aclu, like so they can -- big campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop use of solitary or at least significant curb its use. we have been very active the last seven years litigating to preve
as possible and bring the human- rights violators to justice. it has been six years since the civil war came to an end. it could be true they have acted out of fear to get justice. the operator arrested in the universal jurisdiction is in vote when the government is considered unwilling or unable to take action against the perpetrator. in the case of nepal, it is different. the parties are still negotiating on the promise of the truth and reconciliation commission. >> if you were in charge of and your family and home were destroyed in a storm, the immediate problem is where to live and with him. a helping hand is what you need. in the philippines, thousands of orphans need special help. that is after the damage of a typhoon last month. we have a report from one of the worst hit areas. >> the christmas break is over. is the first week of school. these peoples are not attending regular classes yet. this is a special group counseling session for survivors. this 8-year-old lost six cousins during the typhoon. he says he would have been dead if his brother had not saved him. he watched his house
life. for a lot of americans, i mean, that's a war that's about principle, right? and the civil war is about principle. and world war ii's about principle, and world war i's about principle but then we have these other battles, these other wars that people are involved in that really aren't about principle. and certainly the u.s./mexican war fell into that category. >> quick question about the -- [inaudible] >> yep. >> i'm sure you can have a lively discussion about the treaty and how -- [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] 67 years later there's a huge push to -- [inaudible] >> yeah. >> there's a huge push to -- [inaudible] >> right. >> in 1912 there's a strike in bloomington, illinois, which is not far from here, where they imported mexican labor. it's out of the newspaper. >> yeah. >> and when the mexican workers got here and realized that the union was on strike, they refused to work and effectively ended the strike. so there's a huge turn around as far as attitude and, again, the people, what happened to the -- >> well, there is but there isn't a change in attitudes, right? i me
in 2013? >> anderson, you're right. seven years after the civil war was when this law was written. and i'll tell you, we have a lot of old laws on the books. in fact, the government code for california refers to the attorney general as "he" in most sections where it talks about her authority. so we certainly have arcane laws on the books, but the most important thing is we fix this problem and put the law back on the side of victims. because in this case, we're talking about a woman who was raped and she deserves justice. and we want to make sure also that that rapist faces severe and swift accountability and consequence. >> it's also like this is something that hasn't been called into question for decades. it prevented prosecutors pursuing a rape charge a few years ago. and there was a bill that passed the house several years ago but died in the senate. what happened? >> that year, there were a number of criminal justice initiatives that stalled because of concern that they would add to the budget, the criminal justice budget of california. i don't agree with that, but that's what happe
, and food and clean water. human rights groups are holding solidarity civiles across -- vigils across the world. activists say the red cross received hundreds of millions of dollars in donations but they say very little has gone to help earthquake survey survivors. >>> seismologists giving a second thought to a theory on how a major earthquake on the san andorra warehouse fault mate effect thousands of people in california. the two sections of the fault are considered locked but the central section of the fault creeps and thought to provide a buffer between the two zones. but the magnitude 9 earthquake in japan two years ago proved that theory is not always true. >>> a public memorial is planned tomorrow for the petaluma teenager who died after a new years eve party in south like tahoe. her body was found behind a snow bank just a week ago. she attended a music festival and may well have vied to walk three miles back to her hotel. tomorrow's memorial is at the public school. >>> karl bell soup company in south sacramento will be laying off 290 workers on february 1st. all 750 employe
. in a statement, he said the protesters have the constitutional right to demonstrate. he also called on his partners to help preserve civil peace. but he shifted the blame on to parliament, and called on it to do with protesters' demands. but the mass rally seemed to have expanded. friday marked one of the biggest days of demonstrations that have taken part in the last two weeks in at least 15,000 cities across the country. they are calling for equality and the end to the targeting of zunis. when nothing less. -- sunnis, nothing less. >> a prominent shiite cleric reached out, to a mosque in baghdad. he also went to the catholic church attack in 2010 by sunni fighters. >> we have learned a big lesson from this church and our brother christians in iraq. want to return to peace than confront the terrorists who want to split religions in iraq. >> the leaders of sudan and south sudan are meeting in addis about a -- abbaba to negotiate border disputes. pseudonym and south sudan came close to war last year over the disputes. both accused each other of supporting rebels in each other's territories.
disarray. we're beyond division. we've got anarchy and very clearly defined tribal sectarian civil war in iraq. that's happening right now. but, most important, those men and women that we ask to fight and die, they deserve a policy worthy of their sacrifices. they, in my opinion, do not have that policy today. >> suarez: on "fox news sunday" last weekend, south carolina senator lindsey graham made clear that republicans have not forgotten or forgiven. >> i can tell you there would be very little republican support for his nomination. at the end of the day, there will be very few votes. >> suarez: meanwhile a group of republican and democratic officials have written to the president, expressing their support for hagel, and they're mounting a campaign with radio ads. >> i've know him since his early days in the senate. we have consulted and talked often about foreign policy. >> suarez: former ambassador thomas pickering is one of hagel's supporters. over a long career, he's gone through the confirmation process nine times. does this process that happens before a nomination and before a
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